How do I install the photocell in my stainless steel transformer?

Integral Lighting

Answer
  1. Make sure your power is OFF and the transformer is NOT plugged into an electrical outlet. *No splice or wiring is required if the transformer is equipped with a jumper connector.
  2. Open the front cover of your transformer housing by lifting the cover UP.
  3. Locate and disconnect the white jumper connector inside the housing. *Save the jumper connector with these instructions for possible future use.
  4. Remove one of the 7/8″ diameter knockouts on the side of the transformer and push the photocell white connector through the knockout hole.
  5. Inside the housing, slide the spacer and the star nut over the white connector and thread onto the photocell and tighten.
  6. Plug the photocell white connector into the housing connector.
  7. Push the front cover back into position and secure with the two screws provided.
  8. Locate the transformer and position the photocell so that no artificial light will shine on the cell. This would cause the photocell to cycle on and off.
  9. Plug the transformer cord into a standard 115/120 volt receptacle. *The transformer cord MUST be plugged into a weather-tight receptacle equipped with a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI).

How do I set the timer in my stainless steel transformer?

Integral Lighting

Answer

Move the tiny blue tabs on the dial outward to turn ON, and inward to turn OFF.

Each segment represents 15 minutes, and there are a total of 96 tabs (representing 24 hours in a day). Before using the timer, it is best to push-in all tabs around the timer dial. You may then pull each 15-minute tab toward the outside of the dial for the times that you want the timer to switch ON.

Setting the current time:
Now that you have set the times that you want the timer to switch ON or OFF, you need to set the current time of day by turning the dial CLOCKWISE until the current time of day is set against the arrow-head.

How do I size a transformer for my lighting installation?

admin

Answer

Calculate the total wattage of all lighting fixtures that will be hooked up to your transformer. The total wattage will be the minimum required output of the transformer.

When sizing a transformer for an LED installation, use the wattage consumed by each lamp, not the wattage output or brightness equivalent.

The industry recommends utilizing 80% of your transformer’s capacity for optimal system life.

Example: a 60 watt transformer would be ideal for the lighting installation below.

How do I mount a low voltage transformer?

admin

Answer
Your power supply should be mounted at least 12 inches above ground level. Many transformers are not completely sealed and should have that clearance according to UL 1838.

Why does my transformer turn on, off, and then back on after a period of time?

admin

Answer

Most low voltage transformers are equipped with thermal protection. If your power unit is undersized (overloaded) it is probably overheating and causing the thermal protection to shut down the unit. Consider using a larger transformer or splitting the load to an additional unit.

Can I mount my low voltage transformer inside?

admin

Answer
No. Generally speaking, low voltage transformers are listed and labeled for “Outdoor Use Only.”

If your installation requires an indoor transformer, consult your local electrical codes… you may be able to purchase a low voltage power supply locally for that specific use. Remember that if you are using a photocell, you may have to make other provisions for controlling the outdoor lighting.

Why is my transformer making a humming noise?

admin

Answer

Low voltage transformer cores are built from thin steel laminations that are stuck together. The cycling on and off over time may have loosened the laminations, creating a slight vibration. This is typical of units that have not been encapsulated with epoxy during the manufacturing process. It does not mean that your power supply will fail.

How do I minimize voltage drop?

admin

Answer
The closer your incandescent fixtures are placed to the transformer, the higher their voltage (and wattage). The farther away you place the fixture, the lower the voltage it will receive. If a cable run is too long, or if too many lights are being powered by a single transformer, noticeable voltage drop may occur.

Voltage drop causes the lights farthest from the transformer to become dimmer than the other lights.

Voltage drop can be minimized in various ways …

  • Upgrade to energy efficient LEDs
  • Utilize a heavier gauge cable
  • Install a higher capacity transformer
  • Consider using multiple transformers
  • Shorten your cable length/run
  • Reduce individual fixture wattage
  • Reduce the total number of fixtures on a run

Voltage drop actually works to your advantage if differences in lamp brightness levels add a desired look and feel to your installation. Remember… bulbs with lower voltage will last longer, requiring less replacement.

How do I ensure proper lamp life?

admin

Answer
The key component to ensuring proper lamp and LED life is voltage. Checking your system with a voltmeter is the only way to confirm that your voltage is correct.